Immunology

MCAT_Retaker
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2018 3:58 am

Immunology

Postby MCAT_Retaker » Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:25 pm

Is there any concept videos on immunology?

What is the difference between Macrophage and Dendritic cell? Are they only part of the innate?

Do MHCI and MHC II involve the innate or adaptive? Do dendritic cells interact with cd8 or cd4?

What is a natural killer cell exactly and what is their role?

these definitions were just confusing as i read more.
NS_Tutor_Katelyn
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Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 11:51 am
Location: Minnesota
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Re: Immunology

Postby NS_Tutor_Katelyn » Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:16 pm

MCAT_Retaker wrote:Is there any concept videos on immunology?

What is the difference between Macrophage and Dendritic cell? Are they only part of the innate?

Do MHCI and MHC II involve the innate or adaptive? Do dendritic cells interact with cd8 or cd4?

What is a natural killer cell exactly and what is their role?

these definitions were just confusing as i read more.


Yes, there is a content review video on immunology.

Both macrophages and dendritic cells are APCs (antigen presenting cells), meaning that they can activate the adaptive immune response by exposing T Cells to antigens. The difference is that macrophages hunt and destroy pathogens, while dendritic cells do not. Think of dendritic cells as being primarily "messenger" cells, while macrophages are killer cells with a secondary messenger function. Macrophages are firmly part of the innate response, while dendritic cells are a sort of messenger between the innate/adaptive responses.

The MHC complexes involve both the innate and adaptive responses. MHC Class I receptors are found on all cells. When a host cell becomes infected, it displays an antigen on its MHC I receptor, which in turn binds to the CD8 receptor on a cytotoxic T cell, resulting in the T cell lysing (destroying) the infected host cell. MHC Class II receptors are only found on professional APCs (such as macrophages and dendritic cells). These interact with the CD4 receptors on helper T cells to activate the adaptive immune response.

A natural killer cell is a lymphocyte of the innate immune response that lyses infected host cells. It plays an analogous role to cytotoxic T cells, but is less specific.

Hopefully that helps clear everything up!

-Kate
Katelyn Sawyer
Senior Tutor
katelyn@nextsteptestprep.com
MCAT_Retaker
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2018 3:58 am

Re: Immunology

Postby MCAT_Retaker » Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:31 pm

NS_Tutor_Katelyn wrote:
MCAT_Retaker wrote:Is there any concept videos on immunology?

What is the difference between Macrophage and Dendritic cell? Are they only part of the innate?

Do MHCI and MHC II involve the innate or adaptive? Do dendritic cells interact with cd8 or cd4?

What is a natural killer cell exactly and what is their role?

these definitions were just confusing as i read more.


Yes, there is a content review video on immunology.

Both macrophages and dendritic cells are APCs (antigen presenting cells), meaning that they can activate the adaptive immune response by exposing T Cells to antigens. The difference is that macrophages hunt and destroy pathogens, while dendritic cells do not. Think of dendritic cells as being primarily "messenger" cells, while macrophages are killer cells with a secondary messenger function. Macrophages are firmly part of the innate response, while dendritic cells are a sort of messenger between the innate/adaptive responses.

The MHC complexes involve both the innate and adaptive responses. MHC Class I receptors are found on all cells. When a host cell becomes infected, it displays an antigen on its MHC I receptor, which in turn binds to the CD8 receptor on a cytotoxic T cell, resulting in the T cell lysing (destroying) the infected host cell. MHC Class II receptors are only found on professional APCs (such as macrophages and dendritic cells). These interact with the CD4 receptors on helper T cells to activate the adaptive immune response.

A natural killer cell is a lymphocyte of the innate immune response that lyses infected host cells. It plays an analogous role to cytotoxic T cells, but is less specific.

Hopefully that helps clear everything up!

-Kate


perfect. thank you

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