NS FL 7 P/S #37

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EXS091
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Joined: Tue Feb 19, 2019 4:57 pm

NS FL 7 P/S #37

Post by EXS091 » Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:56 pm

The explanation to this question states that we cannot use the data provided - "cases per 100,000 black males" to draw a conclusion about the 55-year old black male presenting with TB symptoms.

In general- do we avoid using broad population data to draw conclusions about an individual?

If we had been presented with the data for # of TB cases per 100,000 black males ages 50-65, could we then draw a data-based conclusion about our patient? What if the data was for # of TB cases per 100,000 black individuals (sex not specified) ages 50 and greater... could we use that data to draw a conclusion?

I am unclear of how specific the population data has to be to the individual patient demographic parameters to be able to draw data-based conclusions. Please clarify.
NS_Tutor_Katelyn
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Re: NS FL 7 P/S #37

Post by NS_Tutor_Katelyn » Mon Apr 29, 2019 3:22 pm

EXS091 wrote:
Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:56 pm
The explanation to this question states that we cannot use the data provided - "cases per 100,000 black males" to draw a conclusion about the 55-year old black male presenting with TB symptoms.

In general- do we avoid using broad population data to draw conclusions about an individual?

If we had been presented with the data for # of TB cases per 100,000 black males ages 50-65, could we then draw a data-based conclusion about our patient? What if the data was for # of TB cases per 100,000 black individuals (sex not specified) ages 50 and greater... could we use that data to draw a conclusion?

I am unclear of how specific the population data has to be to the individual patient demographic parameters to be able to draw data-based conclusions. Please clarify.
The question of "how specific does population level data need to be in order to draw reliable conclusions about an individual" is a subjective question, one that, if you asked 10 different sociologists, you'd probably get 10 different answers. For that reason, it's not something I'd recommend you worry about for the MCAT, which tends to avoid those kinds of issues. The short answer is that you should generally assume that population level data can't tell you much about an individual.
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