Full-length#4 Bio/biochem #17

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jkwdo12
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Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 10:18 pm

Full-length#4 Bio/biochem #17

Post by jkwdo12 » Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:26 pm

Given that question is asking for minimum number of antigen that have to be blocked, wouldn't it make sense to include tr1 as potential target along with tr2 and tr3? Because tr1 is present in both serotype1 and serotype 3, I thought that tr1 has to be blocked. Apparently, the correct answer is tr2 and tr3. Because tr2 and tr3 are simultaneously present with tr1 in serotype 3 and serotype 1, respectively, does that mean that we only have to knock out only one antigen in each serotype in order to prevent the expression of the that setotype? I want to say thank you in advance for clarifying this:)
NS_Tutor_Katelyn
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Re: Full-length#4 Bio/biochem #17

Post by NS_Tutor_Katelyn » Wed Jul 04, 2018 2:37 pm

jkwdo12 wrote:Given that question is asking for minimum number of antigen that have to be blocked, wouldn't it make sense to include tr1 as potential target along with tr2 and tr3? Because tr1 is present in both serotype1 and serotype 3, I thought that tr1 has to be blocked. Apparently, the correct answer is tr2 and tr3. Because tr2 and tr3 are simultaneously present with tr1 in serotype 3 and serotype 1, respectively, does that mean that we only have to knock out only one antigen in each serotype in order to prevent the expression of the that setotype? I want to say thank you in advance for clarifying this:)
Correct, we know from the question stem that antigens label led tr are conserved, so the loss or mutation of any one will block the virus. We can protect against the virus by blocking tr2 and tr3 because all viruses contain those two. Blocking tr1 as well would not be necessary.

-Kate
Katelyn Sawyer
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katelyn@nextsteptestprep.com
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